A new and better test for women - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Page last updated: 06 December 2019 (this page is generated automatically and reflects updates to other content within the website)

PDF Version: A new and better test for women brochure - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (PDF 1244 KB)

A new and better test for women


Talk to your health worker today – for yourself, your family and your community.
Regular tests as part of your women’s health checks is the best way to stay healthy and strong for yourself, your family and your community.

What is the new test?

The Pap test has been replaced with a new test, which you only have to do every five years.

The test is quick and simple. If you have ever had a Pap test before, the way this test is done will feel the same.

It might be a bit uncomfortable, but it shouldn’t hurt. If it hurts, tell your health worker straight away.

A health worker could be a general practitioner (GP), nurse or doctor at an Aboriginal Medical Service, community or women’s health centre, or family planning and sexual health clinic.

Remember, you can always ask for a female health worker to do your test.

The new test is safe and better.

Although it will feel the same for you, the new test is better. This is because it checks for a virus that could cause changes to your cells.

It is safe to have this new test every five years, instead of two like the old Pap test.

Your health worker will get your results about two weeks after your test and may contact you to talk about your results.

When do I need my next test?

For most women aged 25-74 years your next test is due 2 years after your last Pap test and then it will be every 5 years if your result is okay.

If you’re unsure when your next test is due, talk to your health worker.

Three months before you’re due to have your next test, you’ll receive an invitation to remind you to make an appointment with your health worker.

Where can I go for more information?

If you have any symptoms, such as unusual pain or bleeding, you should see your health worker immediately.

You can also find out more at:
www.cancerscreening.gov.au/cervical
or by calling 13 15 56

If you have problems with your health, you should see your health worker immediately.